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after knowing that he won was bill clinton. is that right? >> exactly, yes. >> does he feel a debt of gratitude to him? >> well, there's no question about it. as he said to president clinton, he was the most valuable player in this campaign. and we got a chance to spend some time with president clinton over the weekend. he just campaigned his heart out. and he was a -- because he believes that there were two choices here and one led us forward and one led us back. and he was very effective out there. there is a strong sense of gratitude and i think the president is looking forward to calling on president clinton in the future for advice, council and assistance as we move this country forward. >> secondly, the biggest tragedy of the whole evening for many of us was the fact that your mustache gets to stay on. are you a relieved man this morning? >> i will say, when i made the bet, the bet was if we lost pennsylvania, michigan or minnesota i would shave off my mustache. i did it with complete confidence that this mustache, which has been appended to my face for 40 years was going now
of our collective deliberations. as bill clinton might say, it's just arithmetic. in fact, this situation of a divided government has only two possible outcomes -- action based upon good faith compromise or no action resulting from political dead lock, and in my position, the latter, is not acceptable to the people of maine and to the people of the united states. we must find a way to act, because many of the problems before us, the debt and deficit is probably the best example, have a time fuse. the longer we avoid acting, the worse they get. in this case, no decision is itself a decision, and it is almost undoubtedly the wrong decision. the challenges before us are too great and the stakes are too high to allow partisan differents to keep us from finding common ground even on the most difficult issues, and i hope that in a small way, in a small way i may be able to act as a brim between the parties, an on -- bridge between the parties, an honest broker to help nudge us toward solutions. i talked to more than a dozen senators of both parties in the past three days and have been impressed
of the bill clinton example, that that's a legacy thing. i think he generally believes it. i think the concern for people on the left has to be that he's coming from a place of he does want to go at the deficit now. he would do a grand bargain. i think part of the grand bargain last time was a bit of saying if i give you this, everything you should want and you still say no, because i know you'll say no -- >> then it shows you're -- >> shows that you're unreasonable. so i think we need to take that with a grain of salt. but he does subscribe -- >> this point is important. i'm not huge for psychoanalyzing about public figures, but all the reporting, people that have been in meeting with the press, this is not some fabricated thing, it's not out of convenience or political pressure, he believes that we need to get our fiscal house in order, we need to reduce the projections, stabilize debt to gdp, that's a genuine priority of the president of the united states. >> here's what i would love for him to add to the conversation. let's do it with a trigger of our own which is let's say put all this --
, former chief of staff for bill clinton bowles on closing bell yesterday talking about the long-term consequences of the fiscal cliff. >> if we do get our house in order, the future of america is bright and can compete with the best and brightest wherever they are. if we don't, we're on our way to becoming a second-rate power. >> joined by illinois congressman peter ross couple. he sits on the ways and means committee and joins us with john harwood and myself at the white house. congressman, good morning. >> hey, good morning, great to be with you. >> we already have the president wishing the speaker a happy birthday. i guess baby steps. right? how do you think the tone is shaping up today? >> i think the tone is good. look. president obama won on tuesday last. the speaker of the house congratulated him and lid out a pathway for the president to lead the nation on how to avoid the fiscal cliff and transform us in to the world class status we want to stay and maintain. so far i think the language is good. there's opportunities i think to find common ground. there's no voices on t
-times" washington bureau chief, lynn sweet. bill, we'll start with you, you heard senator mccain, if hillary clinton leads the state department do you think that susan rice has a better chance at the job, especially after we heard on friday from senators conrad and feinstein, saying that rice was really only saying what she was told she could say from the c.i.a.? >> that's right. she appears to have followed talking points from the c.i.a., which were wrong. the talking points said that what happened in libya, that terrible tragedy was a spontaneous protest, hked by extremists. the problem was the information was incorrect. it was actually a premeditated terrorist attack. as the c.i.a. now acknowledges. that's an issue, it should be debated and fully discussed. i don't know that it is so terribly disqualifying, the way senators mccain and graham have made it out to be. as to say this woman is not qualified to be secretary of state. that's a very different issue. >> lynn, what do you think? you wrote about the issue and you say that the president, the roots go very deep with rice here. the commitment
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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